This legendary actress never wanted a funeral, memorial, or grave marking after she died

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Doris Day, the famous actress and singer, passed away two years ago. She was a shining star during the Hollywood Golden Age and lived until the age of 97.

From 1947 to 1967, she shared over 650 songs, starred in nearly 30 movies, and received many awards for her dedication to music and filmmaking, such as the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Despite the beloved actress and singer’s passing in 2019, a recent disclosure from a close friend indicates that she did not wish for a burial, memorial service, or grave marker. Let’s delve into the reasons behind this decision.

Doris Day is truly admirable for various reasons, such as her talent, affection for animals, and humble nature.

Doris enjoyed a successful career spanning five decades, earning admiration and respect for her contributions to the film industry. She became a household name through her memorable performances in movies like Pillow Talk, Love Me or Leave Me, and The Man Who Knew Too Much.

The 97-year-old woman was married four times but only had one child. Terry Mulcher, who was Day’s son from her first marriage to Al Jorden, died from cancer in 2004.

Day, a famous animal rights advocate, was not only successful in the film industry but also dedicated to speaking up for voiceless animals. Known for her kindness, she passionately fought for the rights of animals.

Doris, who had won a Grammy, was also a celebrated singer.

Three of her songs, Sentimental Journey, Secret Love, and Que Sera Sera, were honored with a place in the Grammy Hall of Fame. Additionally, her passion for animals led to the establishment of the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

In 2019, Doris Day sadly passed away at her home in Carmel Valley, California. The Doris Day Animal Foundation, her charity, confirmed her death due to pneumonia. As per her wishes, there will be no burial ceremonies, gravestone, or any public remembrance.

She was instead cremated, and her remains were dispersed.

Bob Bashara, her close friend and manager, revealed that she had difficulty facing the idea of death and therefore avoided any conversations about funeral arrangements.

And there was a genuine reason for her final wishes.

In an interview, he mentioned that she had a strong aversion to death and couldn’t bear the thought of being present when her animals had to be euthanized. Accepting the concept of death was something she struggled with.

Bashara remembers that when discussing taking care of her dogs after she passed away, she would avoid the topic and simply tell him to take care of them.

When she wrote her will, she had multiple dogs that she cared deeply for. She avoided discussing the inevitable passing of her beloved pets.

Day became an active advocate for animal rights in the early 1970s, condemning the wearing of fur and founding the Doris Day Animal Foundation.

More than 1,000 of her belongings were sold through an auction in 2020, resulting in a remarkable $3 million raised for the cause. Additionally, she played a significant role in setting up a Texas Horse Rescue and Adoption Center, which aims to offer care and support to horses that have been neglected or abandoned.

Day was raised a Catholic and, after marrying producer Martin Melcher, became a committed Christian Scientist.

Al Jorden, a trombonist, was her first husband whom she met at the age of 16. They had a son together named Terrence “Terry” Paul Jorden. However, after Day’s third marriage to Martin Melcher, a film producer, Jorden was adopted by Melcher and his name was changed to Terrence Paul Melcher.

Day “drifted away” from organized religion after Melcher died in 1968, Bashara explained, but remained “a spiritual person.”

“She believed in God, and she thought her voice was God-given,” he says. “She would say, ‘God gave me a voice, and I just used it.’”

After retiring from acting in the early 1970s, Day made a comeback for two TV shows. Later, in 1985, she took on the role of a host for her own talk show called “Doris Day’s Best Friends” on the Christian Broadcasting Network. This show aired for a year.

Her friend and manager Bashara says he remains unsure as to why Day was reluctant to have a funeral, but explains, “I think it was because she was a very shy person.”

Kaley Cuoco To Play Doris Day In Warner Bros TV Limited Series. 

Cuoco, who is both the executive producer and star of The Flight Attendant, is working on a new limited series. This series will be based on the book Doris Day: Her Own Story by Hotchner, which was published in 1976.

Warner Bros., Norman Productions, and Cuoco’s Yes After Flight Attendant, television is collaborating with Berlanti Production once more. As of right now, no network is connected.

After her third husband died in 1968, leaving her in debt, she managed to avoid financial ruin in the 1970s by reluctantly taking a job in television. Despite her dislike for the industry, it helped her stay afloat. It was during this time that Day began her advocacy for animals. Following in her footsteps, Cuoco also champions and supports causes that promote animal welfare.

Cuoco’s exclusive deal with Warner Bros. Television Group, known as Yes, Norman, continues to bring forth new original programming, with the latest project being the Doris Day series. In 2019, she furthered her partnership with the Studio by signing an exclusive multiyear agreement, solidifying their collaboration.

He said Day knew her fans loved her from the letters she received but never understood why so many people loved her.

He mentions that she always stayed true to herself despite her fame, remaining the same talented girl from Cincinnati who pursued her passion without letting it change her.

She was cremated and had her ashes scattered.

Her estate was donated to charity.

Doris Day, the iconic actress and singer, will always hold a special place in our hearts.

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